Intercourse Week Occasion Addresses Widespread Myths Round Sexual Well being | Information

Sex educator and author Mari Kemper drew attention to how politicians spread misinformation about sexual health on other political agendas at an event held on Friday during the college’s annual sex week.

Students registered for the event on Friday in an Emerson classroom titled “This Is How It Doesn’t Work: Debunking Sex-Related Myths and Laws.”

Kemper began her talk – which covered topics such as rape, birth control, abortion, and sexually transmitted diseases – by warning that she was not using trigger warnings in her discussion of sensitive topics.

“I don’t give trigger warnings because I think my topic is like a huge trigger,” she said. “My general strategy is to be blunt.”

For example, when asked for advice by a viewer on how to talk to their three younger brothers about safe sex, Kemper encouraged them to be direct.

“In all honesty, I would buy them some condoms,” she said, encouraging viewers to let their siblings know that the two most important parts of safer sex are “condoms and consent.”

Contrary to Kemper’s progressive philosophy of sex education, she said some politicians spread misinformation in order to limit women’s control over their bodies.

Kemper accused certain conservative politicians of spreading sexual health misunderstandings, including Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas), late talk radio host Rush Limbaugh, and former US President George W. Bush.

She cited a controversy from 2012 when former US MP Todd Akin (R-Mo.) Claimed that restrictive abortion laws do not need exemptions for pregnancies caused by rape or incest.

“If the rape is legitimate, the female body has ways of stopping it,” Akin said falsely in 2012, although he later stated that he had “spoken wrongly.”

Kemper argued that restrictive policies regarding sex are aimed at controlling the female body. She made arguments against forms of contraception, claiming that access leads to an increase in the number of women having sex.

Those arguments state that “women will have too much sex if we provide this additional method of preventing pregnancy,” said Kemper.

Kemper said after the event that spreading misinformation about sex and pregnancy is having a direct impact on women’s bodies. She urged the audience to take into account politicians’ attitudes towards sexual health when voting.

“I want to excite people and make them a little angry and really get motivated to vote,” she said. “I think that sometimes we don’t realize how much influence politicians have on our bodies, on our lives.”

Kemper also applauded Harvard Sex Week for creating a space to encourage open conversation and clear up common misconceptions about sex.

“I think colleges are way better at this than high schools,” she said of the overall quality of sex education.

“I think [college] is one of the first times we’ve all really spoken openly about sex, ”she added. “It’s fun getting into college and being honest for the first time.”

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